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I know for a fact that Kevlar doesn't stretch at all!!!!! I think it's the same for carbon but not sure. Either way they're so similar in feel I'd say it doesn't matter on a car.
 

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There is virtuall no similarity between carbon and kevlar, carbon is very light and stiff in all planes, especially when moulded in curves, it does however shatter creating nasty shards (not good in seats) It is therefore very good for replacement panels, wings etc,so long as you dont want them to survive a crash.

Kevlar is very slightly heavier, and is fairly flexible, it will absorb a large impact without degrading (it is the resin which cracks, not the kevlar) In fact in its unresinated form it is used in bullet proof vests. It is commonly used in rlly car tank guards, as it doesnt shatter from stone impact. The problam here is that it is easily abraded, ao it is best to cover it with a layer of glass fibre to avoid undue abrasion.

Mixing the two in a weave gives an entirely different substrate, you an make a laminate which is light, stiff, but not brittle, and is good for seats and areas of the car which need inpact absorbing qualities (ie they need to crumple more than carbon) Obviously neither is a substitute for steel in crumple zones, but they weigh a lot less.
 

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carbon is immensly stiff, so for wings and stuff, it can be made thin and light, keflar would be floppy, or if you made it stiff enough, too heavy. Kevlar is strong due to flexibility, so good for stuff like tank guards, the reason for the mix in seats is to get sufficient strength, but avoid it splintering and killing you in an impact.

Its just most ****ers use carbon for everything cos it looks cool!
 
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